5 Greatest Financial Tips for Young Adults

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It’s no secret to my faithful followers that I have a senior in high school.  Now could not be a better time for me to gain financial knowledge, develop investing skills, and understand credit education.  I’m anxious to learn and share that information and the practices I’ve implemented to improve my financial situation with not only my audience but my children as well. Especially my teenager getting ready to soon transition into young adulthood.  Although, I have a wealth of information to share,  below are the greatest 5 financial tips for young adults!

5 Greatest Financial Tips for Young Adults

1.  Use Credit Wisely

When I started college in 2001 and even still now, freshman are bombarded with credit card opportunities.  It was those opportunities that introduced me to credit card debt myself.  I’ve been educating my high school senior on good credit practices.  This includes encouraging her to avoid credit (as best practice) or to only charge what she can afford to pay back at the next bill cycle.

2.  Avoid Student Loan Debt

As my high school senior approaches college, and even before, I’ve encouraged her to avoid college loan debt as much as possible.  I’ve encouraged to take advantage of the early college option which would allow her to have completed all her college prerequisites by high school graduation.  Taking college courses is another option available to juniors and seniors at her school.  Finally, picking a major and determining if she can reach the same goals with an associates degree as opposed to a bachelors.

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3.  Save 

My daughter has been working for about 6 plus months now, after quitting her first job.  Originally, we encouraged her to save something from her paycheck and she would, like $5.00.  Afterwards we challenged her to save $500 by Christmas, which she has and wants to continue.  She decided that she would like to save as much as possible so she will not be restricted by money (or the lack thereof) in college.

4. Minimize Expenses

Approaching college, I’ve taught my daughter how to shop with coupons, plan as much as possible, and determine needs vs wants.  These are all imperative in minimizing expenses.  Beyond college, we’ve discussed moving back home as opposed to renting, and avoiding purchasing a new car with a new job during or after college.

5.  Be Patient

If you are wondering what patience has to do with finances, I’ll explain.  In my debt story, most of my debt (aside from student loans) derived from wants over needs, and satisfying those needs immediately with credit.  Emphasizing the importance of patience as a life virtue, will hopefully prevent my daughter from those impulse purchases and additional costly (and unnecessary) credit transactions.

Honestly, all of these financial tips could be learned and implemented at any point in life.  Hell, I’m just learning them within the last 16 months or so.  As a parent, we can appreciate our mistakes so that our children can benefit from the lesson!

If you have a child in college or on the way, be sure to begin a Target College Registry.  Target has all the college essentials to make the college dorm room feel like “their room” away from home!

What financial tips are you teaching your children?  What financial tips would you have liked to have learned earlier?

5 Money Habits to Avoid in a Mate!

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Choosing a mate these days has become so effortless.  This “microwave society” that provides just about everything instantly is partial to blame.  With online dating sites and social media DM’s, it hard to know exactly who the person you’re talking to really is.  Whether you’ve met your mate in person, or via the internet there are 5 money habits in a mate that need to be avoided or addressed as soon as possible.

5 Money Habits to Avoid in Mates

1. Impulse Buyers

Impulse buyers usually make big purchases randomly, unexpectedly, and usually without any logical explanation.  Such purchases may include new cars, boats, RV’s or more.  Impulse buyers may also make reasonable purchases, such as clothes, but spend excessively.  Impulse buyers may also partake in random trips that can be costly without planning and may even invite you along.

It’s difficult to know if impulse buyers are spending cash or credit on such big purchases.  Either way, if spending cash, the cash will not be around long and if paying credit…run!  Just kidding!

2. Big spenders or Ballers

Very similar to impulse buyers, mates that are big spenders spend excessive amounts of money the majority of the time.  Specific behaviors, in addition to those listed above, include VIP services at the clubs, excessive  dining out at expensive restaurants with crowds of people, and/or shopping trips with lots of purchases and/or purchases for friends or family.

Again, it may be difficult to know if the “baller” is spending cash or credit.   If you’re the mate to the big spender and receiving the benefits then it may not appear as a “warning sign” but it can be.

3.Lenders/Enablers

Lenders or enablers are a bit different, but still people should raise concerns.  Lenders/ enablers may be financially responsible, have good credit, and savings.  They may pay bills on time and make mature financial decisions.  However, they may continue to lend money or enable family members or friends financially.  Continuously lending huge amounts of money or supporting someone’s life style can become a finical strain.

Dating a lender/or enabler, I feel is the most difficult.  As the mate you are placed in a compromising situation.  You may be aware that your mate is being taken advantage but how do you tell him or her to stop taking care of or lending money to his mother, sister, niece, or adult child?

4. Avoiders

Avoiders will usually avoid their financial responsibility.  Specifically, avoiding debt collector phone calls and avoiding opening bill statements.  This group may also avoid paying certain bills to either make impulse purchases, spend big time, or lend money.  Additionally, avoiders may also be avoiding financial responsibility because they can not afford it, even though employed.

Avoiders may be the easiest to confront about their habits and convince to a make financially responsible decisions.

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5. Debt Believers

Like the name, debt believers, believe that debt should exist, it’s okay to have debt, and everyone has it or should have it.  Do not believe this.  Usually the “debt believers” will contain all the qualities above because they see nothing wrong their habits.  Debt believers may also be living way beyond their means and also think that it is okay.

 

What Now?

You may have noticed one or all of the signs above and wondering what to do now?  If you have noticed any of these 5 warning signs in your mate then it may be time to make a serious decision about the future and how it may be effected by these traits.  If you feel that the mate is worth continuing to be with or you are already married then a serious conversation may be necessary.  Below are some techniques to facilitate that conversation.

How To:  Financial Conversation

The below tips should be kept in mind when having the financial conversation.  It’s important to keep an open mind to try and understand your mates relationship with money, as well as being able to offer advice.  Additionally,  avoid jumping to conclusions when it comes to this conversation.  There are several books, youtube videos, and blog post that address talking about money with your mate.

  • Open body language
  • “I feel” or “I think” statements as opposed to blaming or defensive “you” statements
  • being respectful
  • Listening carefully and reiterating what you heard to ensure clear understanding.
Have you ever dated anyone in the above categories? How did that go?

 

How to Stop Spending Too Much Money NOW!

How to Stop Spending Too Much Money

Hello!

I’ve recently shared that I’ve been on my Debt Free Journey for a year now.  I plan to share exactly how much debt I’ve managed to eliminate within this year in a later post.  Now, however, I’m addressing what got me into debt and what exactly I’ve done to get out of debt. My first step was to stop spending too much money NOW.

By now you should know the key to getting out of debt is to earn more and spend less! While I definitely don’t consider myself an expert at earning more and spending less, I do think that the things I’ve done to stop spending too much are achievable and can be helpful to someone.  

What I did to stop spending too much money  

1. Track and Analyze my Spending

On a monthly basis, I review my bank statements.  I categorize my spending into gas, fast food, groceries, clothing, and bills and totaled my spending in those areas.  An additional category is miscellaneous which is where I payed close attention to see where exactly where I could cut cost.  I was able to realize just how much “little things” added up such as vending machine trips, candy and sodas from the gas station and random trips from the grocery store, Dollar General, and Target.  Afterwards, I would attempt to decrease spending in all areas by at least 10 percent.

2. Avoid triggers

If you follow me on Instagram, then you’re aware of how tempted I was by Target.  I would take random trips to Target, browse every isle, and spend hundreds of dollars on things I did not need, and some I did.  After maxing out my card, I did the same to my Mister’s card until we had TWO maxed out cards for one household.  Shortly after, I decided to begin my debt free journey.

To avoid behaviors that placed me back in debt, I removed my Target from my pocket book and had my mister place at the top of my closet in a pocket book without me looking.  Afterwards, I cut it up.  Now, to continue avoiding triggers, particularly emotional spending, I’ve unsubscribed from email list to avoid the temptation of online shopping, removed all my cards from my wallet, and shop with list in most cases.

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3.  Use cash

It took me a long time, like a really long time, to develop the habit of using cash instead of swiping my debt card. It also took me a long time to remove my debit card from my wallet and use cash only or the cash envelope system.  The cash envelope system is not working so well for me right now, swiping my cards had become so normal.  I plan on being more diligent and consistent in my efforts.

4. Develop a Budget

I developed a budget about three months into my debt free journey.  That budget did not work out so well after one attempt and I went back to my old system of paying bills, however I made sure to assign an increased amount towards my debt snowball payment.  I’ve since developed a zero based budget, which continues to be a work in progress.

All the above techniques have been helpful in preventing me from spending too much money and paying off debt in this first year of my debt free journey.  It does require lots of determination and discipline, which I didn’t have in the beginning.  Which why, it’s probably called a journey!

In addition to the techniques above, I’ve stopped spending money on these 4 things as well:

  1. Dunken donuts coffee
  2. Manicures and pedicures
  3. Fast food
  4. Pocket books and shoes

Here is a video explaining exactly how much debt I’m in and why I began my journey!

Please add any tips you have to help people from spending too much money below?  Is there anything that you stopped buying that you added back into your budget?

 

Debt Free Journey: Year 1

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If you are new here, WELCOME.  If you’ve been here before Welcome back and thank you for returning!

August 27, 2016 will make an entire year on my debt free journey and the birth of Goaldiggingtohappiness.com.  Here is my very first blog post!  I’ve spent the past couple of days thinking about what has changed in my life, how I’ve changed, and the good and bad of my journey thus far.  If your wondering how could being on such an empowering journey could have any negatives, sit tight, I plan on sharing.  I’ll also be sharing exactly where I am on my debt free journey and where I plan to be in the future.

Debt Payment Update

Amazon 290.9 PAID
Paypal 29.99% $1,136.65 $866.11 PAID
Bill Me Later 29.99% $1,157.99 $1,092.57 $589.80 $294.00 PAID
Citfinancial 13.64% $1,925.70 $1,948.98 $1,709.10 $1,685.24 $1,659.70 $1,388.95 $647.00 PAID July 31, 2016
Wells Fargo 26.49% $2,562.76 $2,506.96 $2,482.80 $2,455.50 $2,687.35 $2,965.16 $2,939.43 $2,592.72
Total $7,283.90 $6,369.62 $4,771.70 $4,434.74 4,347.05 $4,354.11 $3,586.43 $2,592.72

To see exactly where I started, click here.  I’m down to my very last credit card!  I hope to have this paid off by October 31, 2016 or before, I’m leaning more to the before.  Immediately following the month that I pay off Well Fargo, I plan on applying that month’s debt snowball towards my baby ER fund which is not/has not been funded as of yet.

Future Debt Payments

Once our baby ER fund is funded, we (the mister AND I) plan on tackling transportation debt.  We’d like to have our transportation debt paid by December 2017.  Those debts are as follows:

Motocycle loan:                           $4494.59

Tahoe:                                         $6292.72

Honda 2014:                                $16,649.14

Total                                              $27,436.45

Debt Freedom Journey Positives

1.  More money

This is obvious.  In the last 2 months I’ve been able to include sinking fund accounts into my budget and I’ve had money in between pay periods as opposed to before my journey where I’d go from paycheck to paycheck.

2.  Budget

I’ve been budgeting consistently and it has truly changed my outlook on money.  Developing the mindset of telling my money where to go as opposed to my money telling me, has relieved much of the stress about money that I previously had.  For me, organizing my money has lead to my success thus far.

3.  Organization

Once I began to see the affects of my budget and organizing my money, I began to desire the same organization in other aspects of my life.  Particularly, my home.  I’ve created some great spaces, purged some things, and plan to continue in other aspects like work and parenting.

4.  Confidence

My confidence in myself has increased tremendously as I’ve accomplished task that other’s have criticized and judged.  I now believe that anything is possible as long as I put my mind to it.

Debt Free Journey Negatives

I don’t have a huge list of negatives.  The main negatives are the sacrifices and the criticism.  I’ve had to sacrifice lots of things, mainly time.  Time away on the weekends as I work my part time, that I could be enjoying my family.  Another sacrifice, time related, is family vacations.  For the last two summers, my family hasn’t been on a vacation and that has sucked!

The criticism, bothered me a lot when I first started but I was able to deal with it once I realized how common it is.  I wrote a guest post about some of the criticism I received on My Debt Epiphany.  Most of that still holds true today.

I still have not determined exactly when I plan to be completely debt free because I continue to be on the fence about paying off my student loans while on the Human Service Loan Forgiveness Payment Plan.  I also continue to go back and forth about early retirement or working until retirement (I’ll talk more about that later).

Additional Income

I continue to seek out additional ways to earn passive income.  I’m currently considering an income property and I’ve also started a Youtube channel.  I’m just as inconsistent there as I am here.  I plan on improving that.  My youtube channel will focus more on my debt free journey AND my family life.  Finally, Goaldiggintohappiness.com has it’s own Instagram page, Please follow me!

Debt Free Journey Helpful Tips

How has your journey been? How much more debt do you have?

Reasons I Really, Really Want to be Debt Free!

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FIND YOUR WHY?  WHY is the most important thing to determine when beginning any journey.  It is one of the main questions asked in any interview of anyone whom has overcome any obstacle.  Dave Ramsey ask “why” in various forms.   His and Her money always ask “what was it that made you to become debt free?”  Which translates into “why.” If you’ve read this post or this post, you may have gotten a sense of how my journey began and what pushed me to the point that I wanted to become debt free.  However, with over $200k in debt at the age of 30 something, I need more than just one reason to keep on,  what may be a long journey.  In fact, I’ve come to up with about seven main reasons why I want to get out of debt.

I want to be a better mom.

The frustration and burden of debt can leak over into my at home life with my family.  Being stressed and frustrated with the constant credit card bills and the amount of interest charged results in short patience and sometimes disabling head aches, in turn taking me away from my children.

Aside from the stress and head aches, I want my children to have the things I didn’t (cliche) but not the latest electronics and shoes, but experiences.  You see, I don’t really remember what I got for some Christmases or birthdays but I do remember summer vacations, going to my first concert and meeting the members of the boy band.  I want my children to have better experiences, which goes great with my love to travel!

I don’t want to work to live.

The Mister adores the weekend, as do I.  However he goes out on the weekend and splurges just about everything that is left after bills.  We had a conversation about that went something like:

Him:  I work hard during the week, and I deserve to enjoy the weekend and spend my money how I want.

Me:  And with that attitude, you’re setting yourself to always have to work and then live.

Him:  SILENCE!

Yeah so I won that argument. My point however is that continuing to enjoy the weekend from a hard work week, sets us up to have to continue working.  And I don’t want to live that like.  I’ve mentioned before how I want work to be optional within four years and I think I’m on the right track .

I don’t like the “hands” in my paycheck

It’s ridiculous how much of my budget is consumed by lenders.  Of the $1500 -$2000 I may bring home bi-monthly about $2600-$3500 is to lenders.  LENDERS, not utilities or insurance (although insurance is pricey too) but Lenders like Wells Fargo and Honda Financial.  I absolutely hate it.  As I think of ho much money would be freed once I’m debt free, I get so excited which is why I’m unsure if retiring in the four years mentioned above is realistic.

My future is uncertain

My husband and I have been separated before.  The hardship I faced living on my income alone was difficult.  I hustled really, really hard and have been ever since.  Unfortunately, my absence from my children was even more difficult.  Although, I’m not hoping to be separated from him again, it’s a reality of my reality.  Meaning, since I know it has happened before, I’m not naïve that it could happen again.  If so, I’d like to be better financially prepared.

Debt is a stressful burden.

This is pretty self explanatory.  The burden of owing someone and being indebted to them and havoc that can result I decide to not pay or not pay timely is stressful enough to motivate me to eat beans and rice to make sure that any extra penny available is applied to lowering balances.

I HATE restrictions.

I absolutely hate restrictions of any kind.  I just want to do what I want to do. Right now, I’m restricted to my home iced in and I really wish I could fly to the tropical island and absorb some sun. 

Right now I want to see Beyoncé, and Adele, and some comedians but can not afford many of the tickets because of my debt journey and my determination to become debt free.  Even if I wasn’t on a journey, my budget would be restricted from purchasing tickets to ALL the events because of the minimum payments to ALL the LENDERS.

I no longer want to be a statistic.

I’ve had a child at 16, two more by 25, dropped out of college (but returned) and been a recipient of welfare.  Those are all unchangeable statics of my past.  However being a household of consumer debt, with $100k in student loan debt can and will be changed.  I refuse to be a statistic of consumer, student loan or what is also defined as “good debt” at all.

I’m certain as I continue on my journey, I’ll find more reasons that continue to motivate me to accomplishment.  As for now, these are the ones the are plastered in my brain, on journals, in calendars and hand written and folded up in my Bible.

What are your reasons?  How many do you have and how often do you remind yourself of them?

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How to Accelerate the Debt repayment process Pt 2: Cutting the Spending

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How to Accelerate The Debt Repayment Process: Part II appeared first on Goal Digging to Happiness.

Tuesday I blogged about my Accelerated Debt Repayment Process. Since then I’ve been analyzing my spending habits and my budget’s highs and lows, adding and subtracting to come up with a FAIL proof plan to ensure success on my accelerated debt payment process.

We all know that, or should know by now, or will know by the end of this post that the key to eliminating debt is to spend less and earn more.  In order  to determine where I could spend less, I combed through my spending from the previous three months.  I categorized each purchase, specifically of the miscellaneous category .  In the miscellaneous category, I discovered three monthly subscription fees that I immediately cancelled.  

  • Newspaper subscription #1    $11.99
  • Newspaper subscription #2    $8.99
  • Microsoft subscription             $ 10.66

Total                                                $31.64

Next, I discovered that I pay about $36.00 of insufficient fund fees that usually spike around the mid month paycheck.  I discovered this is the result of more than half of my monthly payments coming out of this check.  My resolution was to 1.) add overdraft protection by linking my checking account to my savings and 2.) switch two bills to the end of the month pay period.  This should eliminate the NSF completely.

Additionally, I’m incorporating two No Spend weekends.  I did this back in October and was pretty successful.  I usually do well planning , which reduces the chances of unplanned grocery store trips and/or fast food purchases. If anything is purchased on the weekend it is usually gas.  However because I am dedicated (for right now) I’m planning lots of ‘Netflix and chill’ weekends!

Finally, I’m ditching eating out from the budget completely adding another $50.00 per pay period as excess.  I’ve decided to adapt to vegan eating habits (but do not want to be labeled a vegan).  Since Wilson, NC has not joined the vegan bandwagon, my fast food options are limited to foods that are still not considered healthy (i.e.  Bojangles Cheese biscuits or KFC potato wedges) that I’m not eating either!

With success, I should have an additional $167.64 of excess to apply towards credit card debt payments.  If my calculations are correct, I should be able to eliminate each card in two months or less.  However, I’m still not sure if I will have had the truck  paid off by my target date.  We’ll just have to see!

Now that Christmas is over or a New Year is here, have you reevaluated your budget?  Did you make changes? Add or subtract catagories?

How to Accelerate the Debt Repayment Process

 

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In my 2016 Ready, 2015 outcomes post I discussed my goal to fully fund a home renovation and immediately jumped on the mini goals to accomplish  for January.  However, after receiving some depressing news before even getting started, we’ve decided to alter the focus until we can get professional help in running numbers and making the best financial move for the family.

Even though that plan has been halted at the moment, the goal to become financially free will be a benefit despite the direction we choose to take and continues to remain a major priority for 2016.

In October 2015, I posted my goal to be less $17,000 of debt.  You can read more about that here.  The $17,000 of debt I planned to have paid off included ALL of my credit card debt and one car loan.  I posted my my most recent progress here. I try to stay on target but somethings have gotten in way.  Some not so minor setbacks included, paying car taxes, getting new tires, getting a speeding ticket, and Christmas.  The silver lining of paying all those expenses which totaled over $1500 in the span of 2 months allowed me to come to the realization that I paid $1500 extra dollars in 2 months.  In other words, I could accelerate my debt payment process if I really needed to and/or could be better on track towards meeting my goals.  

I’ve been listening to a bunch of different podcast between Dave Ramsey, His and Her Money, Smart Passive Income, and Problogger.  After listening to several “I’ve paid off $$$ amount of debt” stories on His and Her Money, a couple of “debt shouts” on Dave Ramsey, I’ve decided to accelerate my debt payments as much as I can.

In October 2015 this was my original plan:
  1. Continue with my side hustle and bring in at least $350.00 a month.
  2. Establish at least 2 freelance clients to generate an additional $200.00/month.
  3. Complete over time at least 7 hours which should produce $220.00
  4. Apply my income tax refund to at least two credit card balances.
  5. Continue with the snowball method to pay of my credit cards.
  6. Develop a budget and stick to it!

January 2016 Accelerated Repayment plan

  1. Comb my budget and find extra money
  2. Earn at $400.00 in side hustle income/month
  3. Work overtime at least once/month and apply to debt payments
  4. Work to continue increase my freelance income and apply to debt payments
  5. Purge my home, attempt to sale items monthly and apply to debt payments.

Having credit card debt and brining it into 2016 has, for some reason, began to weigh heavily and be a more unbearable burden enough to drastically make me want to change spending habits to get out of debt much faster!  As a result be prepared to see significantly lower balances month to month so that I am able to reach my goal on or before October 2016!

Have your goals changed already?  Have you already discovered that a goal is not going to get achieved in 2016?  How are you adjusting?

2016 Ready! 2015 Outcome

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Hello!

I hope you guys enjoyed your Christmas and got everything that you hoped for.  My Christmas was great and I’m so excited that it is over and 2016 and a day away.  I’ve got plenty of catching up to do so lets jump right to it.

My vacation began Sunday December 20, 2015.  I was fully prepared with post topics and rough drafts for my vacation but then my computer got a virus.  To fix the virus was $50.00/hour which was not at all in my budget since Christmas completely drained me….like completely.  I just got my computer back but was on a social media fast this last week of the year to gain clarity and direction for my 2016 goals.

I recently came to the conclusion that my blog is less social media since I earn an income from it (or attempt to) and logged back on today.  I even commented on some blogs.  I was surprised to see that even on my nearly two week hiatus, I still managed to get nearly 20 page views/ day and a couple of comments.

2016

In 2016, I’ve decided (for now) on main goals and then decided to break those goals down into mini goals to make achieving them more successful. these goals include:

  • Fully finance our home improvement
  • Establish and build an emergency fund
  • Stop using all credit cards and be out of credit card debt by December 2016
  • Earn or exceed $1,000 blogging income by December 2016
  • Lose 10-15 pounds
  • Generate or exceed $5,000 in side hustle money
  • Increase my income my 10%
  • Increase my financial knowledge
  • Self improve
  • Eliminate overpayment loan

January 2016 goals

  • Purchase materials for the Mister to lay the floors
  • Get a builders permit
  • Pay half of my AM credit card balance
  • Earn or exceed at least $400.00 side hustle income
  • Work out at least once/week
  • Blog at least twice/ week and begin building my email subscibers
  • Save $50.00

I discussed some of my 2016 plans in this post.  I’ve already removed that CF credit card from my wallet, opened the Christmas fund and scheduled my first draft, and plan on opening that savings account on or before Mid January for my car fund. I also purchased this Purpose Driven Planner from Amazon and immediately begin tracking my goals!

TEXT HERE

2015 Outcome

December 2015 debt progress

Card August September October November December
Target $36.10 PAID
HHG $457.02 $280.90 PAID PAID
AM $703.92 $699.27 $693.89 $639.12 $660.08
PP $1232.14 $1215.20 $1197.02 $1144.35 $1136.65
BML $827.70 $1093.39 $1097.26 $1076.36 $1157.99
WF $2716.12 $2679.26 $2714.26 $2588.49 $2562.76
CF $1811.83 $1802.87 $1901.30 $1867.19 $1925.70
CP $579.36 $561.89 $296.08 $194.45 PAID

TOTAL           $8364.19    $8051.88     $7899.81    $7509.68    $7,443.18

I began 2015 with $9,850.45 in credit card debt and I’m ending with $7,443.18, a difference of $2,407.27 and four less credit cards, with the majority of my progress beginning in July with my journey to financial freedom.  Check out previous debt payment progress below.

I’m also ending 2015 with a total debt number of $171,792.33.  Check out my total debt number here, from when I began my journey to financial freedom.  $171,792.33 does not include my student loan debt since I have not intentions of aggressively paying them off because I’m on the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program.

Side Hustle Income

I do hair as a side hustle.  I usually work about 2-4 hours on Friday and about 5 hours on Saturday during the winter months.  In the summer months, while the children are out of school, I work Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.  In 2015 I generated $3,980.05 in side hustle income.

 December 2015

I earned $707.55 in side hustle income for December 2015. The break down is below.  

  • Doing hair side hustle                                $480.90
  • Milage reimbursement                              $127.19
  • Shopping reimbursement apps              $84.46
  • Selling items online                                    $15.00

December 2015 was my first month tracking all my additional income in order to set realistic goals for 2016.  I’m sure I’ll be able to make more money selling items (mostly my children’s clothes) online now that Christmas is gone.  Also the shopping reimbursement apps is the amount earned the entire year but cashed out in December for Christmas.  I did online (freelance and a review) work but have not received payment for them due to me just being able to turn them in.

As for NYE plans, I’m looking forward to dinner and a movie with my love. By dinner and a movie, I mean our favorite take out and a Red box/ Netflix movie and off to bed looking forward to a prosperous 2016!

In one word, how would you sum up 2015?  What are your 2016 goals? What are your NYE plans?

November’s Debt Payment Progress

November Debt Paymnet update

We’re already well into November and Thanksgiving is approaching.  I’m putting my Christmas tree up this weekend (maybe) depending on how much stuff I can eliminate while I’m cleaning.

All the checks have cleared for all my credit card payments and I have my updated progress.  So lets dive right in to see exactly were I am.

Continue reading “November’s Debt Payment Progress”

9 Things to do when you want to quit your journey towards Financial Freedom.

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I know it’s a long title.  I couldn’t think of anything clever to shorten it.

I’ve been on my journey towards financial freedom since July, when I started Goal Digging to Happiness.  My very first post was on July 27, 2015 explaining why I started Goal Digging to Happiness.  It’s only going on 4 months, but I’ve made progress that I’m semi proud of.  Although, I’ve managed to pay off two credit cards and track my payment progress each month, I sometimes become discouraged and often want to quit Goal Digging to Happiness and my journey to financial freedom.

The holidays are fastly approaching, and I’m used to purchasing nice expensive gifts as well as getting what I want when I want it.  I also struggle with the thought of “well I’ve paid two cards, I’m fine with that” and “debt isn’t that bad.”  Despite my nag to give up, I keep going.  To keep going I’ve done one or more or all of the things below at one point or another.

Continue reading “9 Things to do when you want to quit your journey towards Financial Freedom.”